“Rhea Spring”: Shooting in the Morning

Rhea Spring

One of my favorite times of day to photograph is early in the morning, especially when I visit a National Park.  Many people prefer sunset because of the convenience, but at sunrise there are often fewer people.  As the sun comes up the land begins to come alive.

This was a morning a couple of weeks ago at Shiloh National Military Park near Rhea Spring.  The sun was coming up and the water was running well from all of the recent rain.  I don’t always shoot toward the sun, but use the light that is cast over the landscape to photograph scenes.  The fog was rising from the water due to the warming of the landscape and the light highlighted it showing a mist.  The ISO was lowered and shutter speed slowed in order to create the effect with the water and capture to light right for the breaking sun.

Don’t be afraid to try shooting from different positions to get different perspectives.  As the sun rose I spent about an hour capturing the scene before the fog was gone.  I moved around along the creek bed standing, sitting, getting closer and further from the bridge.  The idea was to not only frame the scene the way I wanted, but to work with the natural light of the rising sun.

Advertisements

It’s All About Perspective: Using Depth of Field

DSC_0719black and white8x10

This was taken this past summer when I was visiting Yosemite National Park.  This is a picture of the iconic Yosemite Falls.  We often see pictures trying to highlight the massive size of the waterfall.  Sometimes size is all about perspective.  Sometimes a closeup with other things in front create the same feeling of size.  The attempt was to highlight the size of this massive waterfall, but to give a perspective that is often not seen.  This was taken with a 300 mm lens and using depth of field to highlight the falls.  Although the whole waterfall does not appear in the picture the trees in front and the fact that the waterfall disappears out of the picture at the top and behind a hill in the front give the idea that there is something massive.  It is all about perspective and sometimes getting away from the norm.

 

Ripples

Riples

A close up of the ripples on the water.  The crisp blue water looks refreshing and enticing, but was cold on an early winter day.

 

Moment’s Rest

DSC_7664 5x7

A reflection of a bridge over the river that runs through Yosemite Valley.  I took this early in the morning as I was walking along the river shooting in the early morning light.

Touch the Heavens

Touch the Heavens

“The best remedy for those who are afraid, lonely, or unhappy is to go outside, somewhere where they can be quiet, alone with the heavens, nature, and God.  Because only then does one feel that all is as it should be.”   Anne Frank

Arches National Park

Broken Arch

On my way to Yosemite I was able to spend one evening and morning at Arches National Park outside of Moab, Utah. Arches was an awesome experience to see the natural arches created by erosion. It was also a great place to see the amazing rock formations. Expect to hike to see several of the arches. Some are easy and some are more difficult. Unfortunately, due to time constraints I was unable to do as much hiking as I wanted. I do recommend starting early to avoid the heat of the day and the crowds. If you have time take in a sunrise or sunset.

The Hidden Draw (Creating Depth of Field)

The Hidden Drawword

Early March on the south rim of Grand Canyon National Park was cold and brought the unexpected surprise of snow.  Most of us think of the Grand Canyon as a high desert and are surprised to see pictures of the canyon in snow.  Although the cold and snow was not something I was thrilled about I took full advantage of the opportunity.  Here the canyon stretches for miles disappearing into the fog.

In order to capture the vastness of the Grand Canyon I took a seat on a rock in order to get lower to the ground and stabilize myself.  By placing myself lower and getting the trees and bushes in the picture it gives the viewer a new perspective.  I don’t usually use people so I use pieces of nature to give a perception of size.  The snow also allows the viewer to feel the coolness of the moment.  Shooting from different angles in the same places can create uniquely different photos.  So give it a try.